Tag Archives: Laser resurfacing Austin

Lasers and Intense Pulsed Light (IPL)  – Austin, TX

Lasers and Intense Pulsed Light (IPL) Austin, TX

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lasers and Intense Pulsed Light (IPL) can provide excellent results in the treatment of a long list of skin problems.

  • Rosacea
  • Fine Lines and Wrinkles
  • Sun Damage
  • Loss of Skin Tone
  • Spider Veins
  • Cherry Angiomas
  • Port Wine Stains
  • Melasma or Hyperpigmentation
  • Keloids/Scars
  • Freckles
  • Tattoo Removal
  • Pigmented Lesions
  • Blood Vessels on the Face, Neck and Chest
  • Hair Removal
  • Precancerous Cells
  • Acne and Acne Scarring

There are many lasers and IPL choices. A laser is a source of high-intensity light tuned to a specific single wavelength. IPL, on the other hand, delivers a broader spectrum of wavelengths, rather than the single wavelength of a laser. The light energy is preferentially absorbed by target tissue selected for treatment, such as blood vessels, tattooed skin, a brown spot, or hair follicles, for example (see list above). The absorbed energy produces heat in the target tissues.

Optimal treatment requires not only the selection of an appropriate laser or IPL, but also proper settings and technique. Here are 7 factors your doctor should be thinking about carefully when planning your treatment.

1.    Are You a Good Candidate?

Your doctor, in consultation with you, must establish that you are likely to benefit from treatment. Then, in addressing your particular requirements, your doctor will customize your procedure.

2.   Are We on the Right Wavelength?

Your doctor must choose the correct light device to obtain the best outcome. The optimal wavelength will be well absorbed as it is pulsed over the target. The aim is to destroy the target, but not harm surrounding tissue. Also, as different wavelengths penetrate to different depths, the depth of the target must also be considered.

3.   How Much Light Energy?

How much energy to apply to the pulse of light? Too little energy will not adequately destroy the target or deliver long-term success. Too much will cause collateral damage to surrounding tissues. Your optimal energy level should be within the therapeutic window, giving good results but not causing collateral damage.

4.   Shorter or Longer Pulse Duration?

The duration of the light pulse should be selected based on what’s being treated, the size of the target, and type of laser.

5.   What’s Your Skin Type?

Your skin type is important is determining wavelength, pulse duration, and light energy level. Darker skin colors tend to absorb more light energy. This tendency increases the risk for burns, unless appropriate adjustments are made. This pertains especially to patients with a tan. If you have a tan, you will get better results with less risk of complications if you schedule your treatment after the tan fades.

6.   How to Stay Cool?

Cooling techniques are used in most laser and light procedures to reduce discomfort as well as the risk of skin injury. The most common methods of cooling include chilled air, cryogen spray, and contact cooling.

7.   What Are Potential Side Effects and Risks?

Your doctor will inform you of potential side effects and the likelihood of their occurrence for your specific situation and procedure. Some possible side effect include:

  • Temporary pain, redness, bruising, blistering and/or crusting
  • Infection, including reactivation of herpes simplex
  • Pigment changes (brown and white marks), which may be permanent
  • Scarring, rare when treatment is performed properly
  • Eye injury, which is why appropriate goggles must be worn

In expert hands, the risks of a laser and IPL treatments are small. Be sure you are treated by a qualified and experienced practitioner to avoid the more severe risks associated with treatment by untrained, inexperienced, or unethical personnel.

If you’re considering laser treatment, Zimmet Vein & Dermatology can help determine if laser is a good option for you. We have years of training and experience in the use of medical lasers for dermatology and vein conditions. Contact us today to make an appointment.


					

Hadley recently posted a Survival Guide on Fractionated CO2 Laser Resurfacing. Here are her photos- before treatment, during recovery, and 40 days after treatment.

Before Fractionated CO2 Laser Resurfacing

Day 1 after Fractionated CO2 Laser Resurfacing

Day 4 after Fractionated CO2 Laser Resurfacing

Day 6 after Fractionated CO2 Resurfacing (Active FX)

Day 40 after Fractionated CO2 Resurfacing

by Hadley, Skin Care Specialist at Zimmet Vein & Dermatology

I recently took the plunge into Fractional CO2 laser resurfacing (Active FX) and survived! As an aesthetician, I’ve experienced a variety of skin treatments but this was by far the most challenging and rewarding. Active FX requires dedicated post-procedure care and maintenance by the patient at home. This process is imperative for proper healing. This guide is based on my personal ActiveFX experience and intended to help patients prepare for and manage the healing phase of Active, Deep or TotalFX.

Active FX Fractional CO2 Laser Resurfacing Video – Part I

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Taken with iPhone, day 7.


It’s Day 7 and I am going about my normal activities. So far, no one has pointed and/or gasped. Without the ointment now my face feels tight and very, very smooth. Still a tiny bit of peeling and the one bruise over my right eyebrow still slightly visible. I’m obsessed with being covered with sunscreen, and yet still, for the few minutes I’m in really intense sun walking to my car between meetings, I’m paranoid about my tender new skin. I put on sunscreen at 6:30 in the morning to walk the dog–that’s new. I’m carrying sunscreen in my car in case I need to re-apply, or ever forget to put it on in the first place (unlikely).

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Here's one of my "before" shots.

Another "before."

The first "after." Dr. Zimmet took this one in his office.

Still Tuesday, July 27

See the Active FX Laser Resurfacing Video, part 1.

It’s the evening of the procedure day and I want to give a quick recap. First we shot some “before” pictures. At about an hour before the actual procedure began Dr. Zimmet’s aesthetician, Hadley, covered my face with a topical anesthetic and gave me a Xanax (mild tranquilizer) and a Vicodin (pain reliever). After about 30 minutes my face started to feel quite numb. After 60 minutes, Dr. Zimmet came and in and administered shots (nerve blockers) to my forehead, near my eyes, and near my mouth. The shots weren’t too bad; Dr. Zimmet “shakes” the area so the shot doesn’t pinch much. And by this time I was feeling the Xanax, which tends to make everything easier. I tied my hair back and Hadley gave me a headband to get all of my hair off my face. They started the chiller—chilled air was blowing on my face the entire time, which felt really good, because the primary feeling from the laser was heat.

Dr. Zimmet started the laser treatment around the edges of my face—he called that “feathering,” I’m not sure why. I think he starts there because the sensation is the least strong. The most sensitive place was around my mouth. It reminded me a little of the sensation with Thermage, which is kind of like being zapped with something hot. He did my eyelids last, and I think using a different tip. I expected that area to be the most sensitive but it wasn’t bad at all. The whole procedure took maybe 30-35 minutes. Afterwards, they gave me a mirror. My face was already kind of brown with little spots all over my skin. We took some more pictures, and then Hadley covered my face with ointment. Dr. Zimmet had told me that it would feel like a major sunburn, and having had some bad sunburns in my teens I remember what that feels like, but I think this may have been even hotter. They gave me some ice to hold to my face, and I did so all the way home. (I went through P. Terry’s–best veggie burgers in Austin!–drive-through on the way home, and I’m sure the guy thought I looked freakish, but I was starving and didn’t really care).

When I got home I felt very sleepy, probably from the Xanax. (And I’m still sleepy now, so will post the recovery directions tomorrow.) When I woke up it felt like most of the ointment had soaked in, so I put some more on and took a close look at my face. It’s pretty puffy, which is normal for the first couple of days. It’s quite brown, like someone with really terrible sun damage. You can see the little dots created by the machine. I took a few pictures. I don’t really feel pain unless I touch my face; the right side feels a little bit sore. I’m supposed to put the ointment on four times a day and not let my face get dry, and I think I might need to apply it even more than that because it feels like it’s soaking in. It still feels kind of hot, and tight. All of which I expected. Can’t wait to see what I look like when I wake up in the morning!

Tuesday, July 27

Today is the day! I woke up at 4 a.m. with that pre-vacation sort of anticipation. I was happy to have time to walk my dog, since he probably won’t have a walk for the next four days unless I can get a friend to walk him. I remembered to wear my glasses instead of contacts, since they’ll be putting the disc things in my eyes before the treatment. I’m here now at Dr. Zimmet’s office, early to meet Julia who is going to interview me and Dr. Zimmet, and possibly Lydia. He went over the entire procedure with me again and asked several times if I had questions. They are very, very thorough here with preparations and checking in. Hadley called yesterday to make sure I’d gotten my prescriptions. I’ve remembered not to wash my face with anything but mild soap (not exfoliating) the last couple of days and I also remembered to take the Valtrex twice yesterday and once this morning. I’m a little nervous . . . curious what it will feel like and will be happy when the actual procedure is over. Dr. Zimmet told me again that I’ll look sunburned and possibly puffy at first and that in the days to come it might feel like the getting-back-to-normal process is taking a long time. I think that will be one of the valuable things about this diary. There are lots of before-and-after pictures online, but I haven’t seen any of the in-between pictures. I plan to post a picture or two every day so you, my readers (I hope there will be some readers!) can see the whole process—the good, bad and the ugly.

Monday, July 26

Tomorrow is the day. I’m excited.  Yesterday I bought some inexpensive blue pillowcases at Target. Dr. Zimmet suggested old pillowcases but I don’t have any of those (except some that I used to cover up plants during winter freezes).  This evening I am planning to go grocery shopping and to the movie store.

Dr. Zimmet’s office called in two prescriptions for me and I picked them up at Walgreen’s on 45th and Guadalupe. Continue reading

Skin Vein